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The existence of gluten sensitivity has been long denied by the mainstream medical establishment. A study described in a previous post over two years ago documented higher incidence of migraine headaches in people with gluten sensitivity than in those with celiac disease (56% vs 30%). Celiac disease, which is a severe autoimmune disease caused by wheat allergy, affects about 3 million Americans, but the estimates of gluten sensitivity run as high as 18 million. Billions of dollars of gluten-free products are sold in the US and they can be found in almost every grocery store.

A recent study by the National Institutes of Health led by Dr. Sabatino examined 59 patients who did not have celiac disease, but believed gluten-containing food was causing them intestinal and other symptoms. Every day for one week these people were randomly given capsules containing 5 grams of gluten or a placebo of rice starch. After only one week, those who were taking the gluten pills reported a significant difference in symptoms compared to those who took non-gluten placebo pills. In addition to intestinal pains, they felt abdominal bloating, a foggy mind, depression, and canker sores. Clearly, they didn’t know if they were taking the gluten pill or the placebo, but their symptoms were very revealing and proved the existence of gluten sensitivity.

The bottom line is, if you have stomach pains, bloating, foggy mind, depression, headaches, malaise, and other symptoms, it may be worth going on a gluten-free diet for a couple of weeks to see if your symptoms improve. Unfortunately, we do not have any tests to document this condition, so this is the only way to find out if you have gluten sensitivity.

We do have tests for celiac disease – this condition can be detected by a blood test and an intestinal biopsy done through an endoscopy. However, despite the availability of these tests, even this severe form of gluten sensitivity is diagnosed in only one out of six Americans who suffer from it. And the number of cases of celiac, just like with non-celiac gluten sensitivity, are going up. The incidence of celiac is now five times higher than 50 years ago.

Stomach pains and bloating are the most common symptoms of celiac, but a recent review in JAMA Pediatrics, lists other symptoms, including persistent or intermittent constipation, vomiting, poor appetite, weight loss or growth delay in children, fatigue, anemia, dental problems, canker sores, arthritis and joint pains, bone loss and fractures, short stature, delayed puberty, unexplained infertility and miscarriage, recurring headaches, loss of feeling in hands and feet, poor coordination and unsteadiness, epileptic seizures, depression, hallucinations, anxiety and panic attacks. Many of these symptoms are the result of poor absorption of vitamins and minerals, including magnesium, vitamin D, vitamin B12, and other because of the damaged intestinal lining.

Those with celiac disease are more sensitive to even minute amounts of gluten than people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

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The new dietary guidelines issued by a government advisory committee have many positive changes from the old guidelines. These include a focus on food rather than nutrients. For example, there is no proposed limit on the intake of cholesterol and eating eggs is encouraged. There is an emphasis on eating less meat and more fruits and vegetables and on limiting sugar intake. All these recommendations apply to headache sufferers as well.

However, the guidelines are advising people to increase their consumption of coffee. They suggest that 3 to 5 cups a day can be part of a healthy diet because there is evidence that coffee may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease (and possibly Parkinson’s disease). This is because coffee contains flavonoid compounds that have health benefits. However, coffee and caffeine in general are proven to cause worsening of headaches. As little as 2-3 cups a day can worsen headaches by causing caffeine withdrawal. Flavonoids are present in many fruits and vegetables, so it is not necessary to drink coffee to benefit from these compounds. If you are prone to having headaches it is better to limit your caffeine intake to one cup of coffee a day.

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